Hotel Ransomware Attack Affects Key Card and Reservation System

A hotel ransomware attack in Austria hit the headlines in the past couple of days. The cyberattack affected the Romantik Seehotel Jägerwirt. The hotel’s computer system was infiltrated by the attacker who installed ransomware. A range of files were encrypted, which prevented the hotel from being able to check-in new guests and issue new key cards for hotel doors.

Hotel Ransomware Attack Hampers Guest Check-ins

Early reports of the hotel ransomware attack suggested hotel guests were locked out of their rooms or, in some cases, locked in their rooms. The latter is not possible as even when electronic key cards are used, locks can be opened manually from the inside. Guests who had been issued with key cards prior to the attack were also able to use their cards to get in their rooms, according to a statement issued by the hotel’s manager.

However, the cyberattack still caused considerable disruption at the 111-year old hotel. According to local news sources, the attack affected the hotel’s key card system, reservation system, and its cash desk.

Since files were encrypted that were necessary to program new key cards, any guest that had not been checked in before the cyberattack occurred experienced considerable delays. The issue was only resolved when the hotel paid the ransom demand of 1500 Euros – approximately £1,300/$1,600. Systems remained out of action for 24 hours as a result of the attack.

This was not the only attack affecting the hotel. A second attack reportedly occurred, although the hotel was able to thwart that attempt by taking its systems offline. Repeat attacks are unfortunately common. If one ransomware attack results in the payment of a ransom, other attacks may also occur as the attackers attempt to extort even more money from their victim. Backdoors are often installed during initial attacks to enable access to continue after payment has been made.

Not being able to check-in new guests for a period of 24 hours can make a serious dent in profits, not only from guests being forced to seek alternative accommodation, but also from the damage to a hotel’s reputation. Such an attack can keep future guests away.

In this case, in addition to paying the ransom demand, the manager of the Romantik Seehotel Jägerwirt confirmed that the hotel will be going old school in the impending future. Rather than continue to use an electronic key card system, the hotel will revert to using standard keys for hotel room doors. Another hotel ransomware attack would therefore not prevent guests from checking in.

Hotels Must be Prepared for Cybersecurity Incidents

This is not the first hotel ransomware attack to have occurred in 2017 and it certainly will not be the last. Hotels are attractive targets for cybercriminals because hotels cannot afford to have critical systems offline for lengthy periods of time due to the disruption they cause. Cybercriminals know that ransom demands are likely to be paid.

In this case, no lasting harm was caused, although that does not mean future attacks will be limited to reservation systems and cash desk operations. Elevator systems may be targeted or other systems that have potential to compromise the health and safety of guests.

Hotels therefore need to make sure that not only are defenses augmented to prevent ransomware attacks, but a data breach response plan is in place to ensure that in the event of a cybersecurity incident, rapid action can be taken to limit the harm caused.

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Elizabeth Hernandez

Elizabeth Hernandez is a news writer on Defensorum. Elizabeth is an experienced journalist who has worked on many publications for several years. Elizabeth writers about compliance and the related areas of IT security breaches. Elizabeth's has a focus data privacy and secure handling of personal information. Elizabeth has a postgraduate degree in journalism. Elizabeth Hernandez is the editor of HIPAAZone. https://twitter.com/ElizabethHzone